The 16 Personalities

Welcome to my article about the 16 personalities, a popular tool used to understand human behavior and personality traits. The 16 personalities are inspired by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which was built on the theory of personality psychology and individuation developed by Carl Jung. Our personality is a complex mixture of inherited traits from our parents and family, and the choices we made during our upbringing that made us who we are today. It’s a constantly evolving aspect of our lives that shapes our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. The personality types in the 16 personalities are based on four dichotomies and 8 key personality traits, including introversion/extroversion, intuition/sensing, feeling/thinking, and judging/perceiving.

How To Know What Your Myers Briggs Personality Type Is

  1. Introversion and Extroversion: Introverted individuals tend to be more reserved, quiet, and introspective, while extroverted individuals tend to be outgoing, sociable, and energized by being around others.
  2. Intuition and Sensing: Individuals who favor intuition tend to be imaginative, open-minded, and interested in novelty and possibility, while those who favor sensing tend to be more grounded in reality, practical, and skeptical of new or untested ideas.
  3. Feeling and Thinking: People who lean towards feeling tend to prioritize empathy, emotions, and interpersonal relationships, while those who lean towards thinking tend to be more analytical, objective, and value logic and reason.
  4. Judging and Perceiving: Individuals who prefer judging tend to be organized, structured, and prefer to plan and make decisions in advance, while those who prefer perceiving tend to be flexible, adaptable, and enjoy spontaneity and improvisation.

These dichotomies combine to form 8 key personality traits that are used to describe the 16 personalities. The 16 personalities are a popular tool for self-discovery and understanding others, and are often used in career counseling, team building, and personal development. The 16 personalities and the Myers Briggs Personality Types are closely related, as the 16 personalities are based on the MBTI framework.

Firstly, 16 personalities help to explain differences in our behavior patterns. Each individual has their own unique way of interacting with the world around them – this is influenced by things like their environment, upbringing, emotions, and beliefs. 16 personality types can give us an insight into why we act the way we do, and provide useful guidance for how to navigate different situations.

Secondly, 16 personalities also help explain differences in our attitudes and values. Every individual has their own set of beliefs and values which are reflected in the decisions we make – 16 personalities can give us a better understanding of why we feel so strongly about certain topics or issues, as well as how to communicate our views more effectively with others.

Finally, 16 personalities can give us insights into our preferences. Our likes and dislikes often shape how we interact with the world – 16 personality types can provide an understanding of why we have certain preferences, as well as how to use them to make better decisions in life.

The 16 Personalities In Short

INFP (Introverted-Intuitive-Feeling-Perceiving) personality type:

INFPs are introverted individuals who are imaginative, empathetic, and prioritize their personal values and emotions. They tend to be sensitive and introspective, enjoying introspection and reflection. They are also intuitive, preferring to look beyond the concrete facts and consider the possibilities and potential of situations. INFPs value emotional authenticity and are often creative and expressive individuals. They tend to be flexible and adaptable, enjoying the freedom to explore new ideas and experiences without feeling constrained by external expectations or rules.

INTP (Introverted-Intuitive-Thinking-Perceiving) personality type:

INTPs are introverted individuals who are analytical, logical, and enjoy exploring complex concepts and theories. They are curious and enjoy understanding how things work, often using their intuition to identify patterns and connections. INTPs value their independence and enjoy exploring new ideas and theories without feeling constrained by traditional ways of thinking. They are often reserved, preferring to spend time alone or with a small group of close friends rather than in large social settings. They tend to be flexible and open-minded, enjoying the freedom to explore new possibilities without feeling constrained by external expectations or rules.

INTJ (Introverted-Intuitive-Thinking-Judging) personality type:

INTJs are introverted individuals who are analytical, logical, and focused on achieving their goals. They are strategic thinkers who enjoy exploring complex concepts and theories, often using their intuition to identify patterns and connections. INTJs value their independence and are often confident in their abilities and decisions. They tend to be organized and structured, preferring to plan and make decisions in advance. INTJs are often reserved, preferring to spend time alone or with a small group of close friends rather than in large social settings. They are often focused on achieving their long-term goals and may struggle with adjusting to change.

INFJ (Introverted-Intuitive-Feeling-Judging) personality type:

INFJs are introverted individuals who are empathetic, imaginative, and prioritize their personal values and emotions. They are intuitive, preferring to look beyond the concrete facts and consider the possibilities and potential of situations. INFJs value emotional authenticity and are often creative and expressive individuals. They tend to be organized and structured, preferring to plan and make decisions in advance. INFJs are often reserved, preferring to spend time alone or with a small group of close friends rather than in large social settings. They are often focused on helping others and may struggle with asserting their own needs and boundaries.

ENFP (Extroverted, Intuitive, Feeling, Perceiving):

ENFPs are outgoing, creative, and imaginative individuals who enjoy exploring new ideas and possibilities. They are empathetic and prioritize emotional connections with others, often forming deep and meaningful relationships. They are adaptable and enjoy spontaneity, but can struggle with follow-through and may become overwhelmed with too many options.

ENTP (Extroverted, Intuitive, Thinking, Perceiving):

ENTPs are quick-witted and intelligent individuals who enjoy challenging themselves and others with new ideas and concepts. They are curious and open-minded, often exploring different perspectives and possibilities. They value logic and reason, but can struggle with emotional expression and may come across as insensitive or detached.

ENTJ (Extroverted, Intuitive, Thinking, Judging):

ENTJs are driven and ambitious individuals who enjoy taking charge and leading others. They are logical and objective, often making decisions based on facts and data rather than emotions. They are organized and structured, preferring to plan and strategize in advance. They can be demanding and critical, but are also highly efficient and effective leaders.

ENFJ (Extroverted, Intuitive, Feeling, Judging):

ENFJs are warm and compassionate individuals who enjoy connecting with others and forming deep and meaningful relationships. They are empathetic and value emotional intelligence, often putting others’ needs before their own. They are organized and structured, preferring to plan and schedule in advance, but can also be flexible and adaptable. They can struggle with setting boundaries and may become overwhelmed with too many responsibilities.

ESFP (Extroverted, Sensing, Feeling, Perceiving):

ESFPs are outgoing and sociable individuals who thrive in social settings and enjoy interacting with others. They are grounded in reality and prefer to experience the world through their senses, making them adept at noticing details and enjoying new experiences. ESFPs prioritize feelings and emotions, valuing personal connections and empathy. They tend to be spontaneous and flexible, preferring to live in the moment and adapt to new situations as they arise.

ESTP (Extroverted, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving):

ESTPs are energetic and outgoing individuals who enjoy being around others and thrive in dynamic environments. They are grounded in reality and prefer to take action in the present moment, making them quick to adapt and respond to changing circumstances. ESTPs tend to be logical and analytical, valuing reason and objectivity in their decision-making. They are also flexible and spontaneous, enjoying new experiences and living in the moment.

ESTJ (Extroverted, Sensing, Thinking, Judging):

ESTJs are organized and structured individuals who value stability and order. They are grounded in reality and prefer to rely on their senses to understand the world around them. ESTJs prioritize logic and reason in their decision-making, valuing objective analysis and practical solutions. They tend to be methodical and prefer to plan ahead, making decisions in advance to ensure everything runs smoothly.

ESFJ (Extroverted, Sensing, Feeling, Judging):

ESFJs are sociable and outgoing individuals who value interpersonal relationships and personal connections. They are grounded in reality and rely on their senses to understand the world around them. ESFJs prioritize feelings and emotions, valuing empathy and understanding in their interactions with others. They tend to be organized and structured, preferring to plan ahead and make decisions in advance to ensure everyone is taken care of.

ISFP (Introverted, Sensing, Feeling, Perceiving):

ISFPs are introverted individuals who are highly attuned to their senses, preferring to take in the world through their five senses rather than relying on intuition. They are also highly attuned to their emotions and prioritize their personal values and beliefs. ISFPs tend to be adaptable, spontaneous, and enjoy exploring new experiences, making them open-minded and flexible. They are also creative and artistic, often expressing themselves through music, art, or other forms of self-expression.

ISTP (Introverted, Sensing, Thinking, Perceiving):

ISTPs are introverted individuals who have a strong preference for sensing over intuition, relying on their five senses to understand and interact with the world around them. They are also analytical and logical, preferring to make decisions based on objective facts rather than emotions or intuition. ISTPs tend to be highly adaptable, flexible, and enjoy taking risks, making them skilled problem-solvers and troubleshooters. They are also independent, self-reliant, and tend to prefer working alone or in small groups.

ISTJ (Introverted, Sensing, Thinking, Judging):

ISTJs are introverted individuals who value practicality and structure. They have a strong preference for sensing, preferring to rely on concrete facts and information to make decisions. ISTJs are also highly analytical and logical, making them excellent problem-solvers and planners. They tend to be organized, reliable, and responsible, preferring to follow rules and procedures to ensure that tasks are completed efficiently and effectively. ISTJs are also loyal and dependable, making them valuable members of a team.

ISFJ (Introverted, Sensing, Feeling, Judging):

ISFJs are introverted individuals who value tradition and stability. They have a strong preference for sensing, preferring to rely on concrete facts and information to make decisions. ISFJs are also highly empathetic and compassionate, prioritizing the feelings and needs of others. They tend to be organized, responsible, and reliable, and are often committed to fulfilling their duties and obligations. ISFJs are also highly loyal and dependable, making them excellent team players who are committed to working towards the common good.

How To Understand The 16 Personalities

Understanding 16 personalities can help us understand ourselves and others better, leading to more harmonious relationships. But avoid overly identifying with a specific personality type. It can feel nice to be understood, but you don’t want to try to overly fit yourself to a specific category.

The 16 personalities are a way of understanding how people act in different situations. The system of 16 personalities is originally called Myers Briggs Personality Types. People who are mature and grown up can act like any personality type, depending on the situation. Carl Jung, the father of personality psychology, did not believe in personality types.

He thought the goal of any individuated person was to have their own unique personality. He would advise people to develop all cognitive functions and to learn to express their personality in a healthy way. He would discuss personality types, but not in a limited sense, but more to illustrate different ways a person might grow to think or feel about life.

This allowed him to have a more individual approach to his patients, focused on each person’s unique path and experiences. After you have gotten familiar with the different personality types, start learning about the eight cognitive functions and the different personality traits of each personality type.

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